Category Archives: RNA

Dominic’s truck progression

This was what it looked like originally.  ’94 Ford Ranger XLT 4×4.

Before

Before

This was after the first lift (a body lift and 33″ tires):

After

After

First mud with first lift

First mud with first lift

After the second lift (straight axles front and rear with 38″ tires)

First mud with second lift

First mud with second lift

 

Mudding runs in the family

 

It appears that building and driving mud trucks runs in the family.

Dominic and his cousin Jason

Dominic and his cousin Jason

Ryan, Ben, Danielle, Dawn, Dominic, and Jason

Ryan, Ben, Danielle, Dawn, Dominic, and Jason

 

More lift for Dominic’s truck

When some lift is not enough lift you lift it more.  Straight axles and larger tires will get the job done.

tl1

Old suspension and rear axle removed and new leaf springs in place.

tl3

Welding part of the axle bracket

tl2

Rear axle installed

Old suspension and drivetrain on the way out

Old suspension and drivetrain on the way out

Old front suspension and drivetrain removed

Old front suspension and drivetrain removed

Old pinion on right, new pinion on left

Old pinion on right, new pinion on left

 

New pinion in case

New pinion in case

 

 

Robert checking the backlash of the ring gear

Robert checking the backlash of the ring gear

 

Checking mesh of ring with pinion

Checking mesh of ring with pinion

 

Preparing for the new front suspension installation

Preparing for the new front suspension installation

 

Welding new spring hangars

Welding new spring hangars

 

New front axle going in

New front axle going in

 

Disc brakes at all four corners

Disc brakes at all four corners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013 Demolition Car

Here we go again.  This year it’s a Lincoln Town Car.

dc3

Dominic and Levi removing the door panels

 

dc2

Ryan removing the windshield

dc1

Danielle crossstiching while the boys work on the car

 

 

Danielle the Mudder

Danielle in Ryan's Toyota

Danielle in Ryan’s Toyota

Danielle and Ryan

Danielle and Ryan

Ryan's truck stuck

Ryan’s truck stuck

Ryan getting un-stuck

Ryan getting un-stuck

Mudding

Mudding

 

 

Ford 460

Dominic periodically works on trucks for other’s and in exchange he’ll get all manner of engines and other parts.

Separating a 460 and its transmission shade tree mechanic style.

Separating a 460 and its transmission shade tree mechanic style.

That 460 and transmission were sold and another one appeared soon after.

Same tree with yet another 460

Same tree with yet another 460

This time it was placed on an engine stand which was not up to the task.

460 on its side

460 on its side

The engine was like an over 600 pound turtle on it’s back.  It was not going to be moved.  This necessitated the purchase of an engine hoist from Harbor Freight which were conveniently on sale that weekend.

 

Dominic’s Truck

Just when you thought he was done:

Before

After

He bought some a used set of mud tires and wheels.  Now with the lift and these tires Dawn will need a ladder to get in and out of it.

And his first day of mudding with his friends:

 

Demolition Car

Dominic and his friend Ryan built a demolition car this summer. It was a ’92 Pontiac Bonneville that still ran good but had lots of other issues.  So it was turned into a demolition car for the county fair.  They worked on it for a couple of months stripping out most all of the interior, moving the batteries, installing an alternate gas tank, and lots of other modifications.

Dominic and Ryan

 

 

Ryan drove the car in the demo derby and did OK without any injuries though the car was finished.  They sold it to a scrap dealer after the race.

Here’s the car after the race:

Weber Smokey Mountain Cart Project

A couple of years ago I got my Dad’s old Weber Smokey Mountain smoker from him.  It was a Father’s Day gift for him many years ago.  He used it to smoke a lot of salmon from Lake Michigan through the ’70’s and ’80’s but hasn’t used it in quite awhile.  It’s been sitting unused in his garage and I wanted to experiment with smoking some meat though not fish as I’ve had a lifetime’s worth of smoked salmon.

While the WSM design has been around for a long time and it has served well as a good smoker an obvious flaw is that it sits low to the ground, is hard to move around without taking it apart, and has no place to set anything while your tending to it.

We solved all of these problems by taking some 3/4″ rigid conduit and welding up a wheeled cart that gets it up off the ground a bit and has a side shelf to set tools or trays of meat.

The most interesting part of the project was getting a chance to work with tube and to work out how to cut what are called “birdsmouths” for the joints.  We had some ideas about how to do it but after speaking with a friend he pointed me at this tool, the JD2 Notchmaster Hole Saw Tube Notcher.   What an obvious way to make the necessary cuts for the joints.  Use a hole saw.  We haven’t purchased a JD2 (yet) so we used a hole saw on our mill.  It worked perfectly.  We can’t quite get all the angles we might need for some projects but it worked for the purposes of the smoker cart project.  Another cool tool for working with tube joints is this: PipeMaster.

And yes, that’s a flame on the door ala frisket and rattle cans.  I figured that it needed a bit of flair to set it apart from all the other WSM’s on the planet.

I also added an official Weber thermometer that I found at a local hardware store.  It was a replacement part for a newer model.  The original did not have one.

Upon completion of the project we tested it out smoking a nine pound pork shoulder for 16 hours.  It turned out great.   Just the beginning of our smoking adventures.

Here’s a site dedicated to the WSM: The Virtual Weber Bullet 

 

Redneck Recliner

Leave a young man and his welder alone with an old piece of a bedframe and the passenger seat from a 1992 Pontiac Bonneville and this is the result: